humanrightswatch

awkwardsituationist:

"the suburb of agbogbloshie in ghana’s capital, accra, has in recent years become a dumping ground for computers and electronic waste from europe and the united states. hundreds of tons of e-waste end up here every month as countries in the west attempt to unload their ever increasing stockpiles of toxic junk. of the 20 to 50 million tons of electronics discarded each year, 70% will end up in poor nations.

"increasingly, this e-waste is finding it’s way to west africa and countries like ghana. traders bypass international laws by labeling the equipment as second hand goods or charity donations, but in reality as much as 80% of the computers sent to ghana are broken or obsolete. their final resting place is the agbogbloshie dump where they are broken apart, mostly by children, to salvage the cooper, hard drives and other components that can be sold on.

"the disposal of electronic goods in the west is a costly affair and must be done in an environmentally responsible manner. however, in places like ghana there are no such regulations, and toxic metals like lead, beryllium, cadmium and mercury are continuously being released, causing untold damage to human health and the environment."

photos and text by andrew mcconnell

S50)

nationalfilmsociety

thechosenjuan:

Alice Guy was the first female film director. She would become the first female movie studio owner, and one of the most prominent filmmakers in the industry, making her one of the highest paid women in the U.S. 

How could such an important figure in the birth of cinema be unknown to us? 

So we, filmmakers Pamela Green and Jarik van Sluijs, had a case, a real detective story. We decided to search for answers. We’ve discovered surprising new information as we began our research and interviews. It turned into a feature documentary in-the-making about Alice Guy-Blaché and the birth of cinema – Be Natural.

This Kickstarter is so incredibly important to educating people about film history and more importantly the role of women in the earliest days of cinema and if you’re into film you should really consider donating to this.